Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
» General information
» History
» Information about regions
» Main cities
» Culture
» Nature
» Geography

Tourism
» Cultural & Eco-Tourism
» Adventure Tourism
» Recreation Tourism
» Special Interest Tourism
» Business Tourism
» Photo Gallery
» Tour Operators of Kyrgyzstan
» State Agency of Tourism
Travel Info
» Visa & registration
» Accommodation
» Places to eat
» Transport
» Communications and the media
» Money
» Other
 
  Kyrgyzstan » Kyrgyzstan
 
 


Kyrgyzstan

Peak Khan Tengri

Khan Tengri: lies in the Issyk Kul oblast near the border with Kazakhstan . (The name is translated variously as “Prince of Spirits” or “Ruler of the Sky”) Until recently the summit was said to be 6995 m. a.s.l. but a recent survey announced that it is, in fact, 7010m – however some people treat…


Some other Kyrgyz Peaks

Some other peaks, most of these names will mean little except to experienced mountaineers, but these are some of the more famous peaks: Adynge: In the the Ala Archa national park, rising to 4393m – and the slopes provide trekking territory rather than mountaineering. Chapaev: 6371m – in the Central Tien Shan, Muztag massif. Corona…


Mountaineering Base Camps

There are a number of base camps for mountaineers, trekkers, and others which operate during July, August and the first part of September. The camps have facilities for accommodating expeditions and supporting ascents of the nearby peaks: tents, excellent food, showers, sauna, communication facilities (radio, satellite telephone, internet), and an experienced, skilled, enthusiatic and hospitable…


Early History

Stone implements found in the Tian Shan mountains indicate the presence of human society in what is now Kyrgyzstan as many as 200,000 to 300,000 years ago. The first written records of a Kyrgyz civilization appear in Chinese chronicles beginning about 2000 B.C. The Kyrgyz, a nomadic people, originally inhabited an area of present-day northwestern…


At Bashi— the Horse’s Head

One picturesque Kyrgyz story tells of a herder who had sold his cattle in the Andijan region (now in Uzbekistan) and on his return, exhausted, he settled down for the night at a place called Jailoo (“pasture”) and turned his horse free. The horse wandered and fed at a place called Arpa (“barley”). When the…


Self – sounding instruments

As known, self-sounding instruments (idiophones) are the instruments in which the source of oscillation is the body or its part, but not strings, membrane or air pressure. To such instruments in Kyrgyz musical culture concern so called lip (mouth) komuz of several kinds, tambourines, bells and the other instruments making cracking sounds. In this group…


Kyrgyzstan – Mongol Domination

The Mongols’ invasion of Central Asia in the fourteenth century devastated the territory of Kyrgyzstan, costing its people their independence and their written language. The son of Chinggis (Genghis) Khan, Dzhuchi, conquered the Kyrgyz tribes of the Yenisey region, who by this time had become disunited. For the next 200 years, the Kyrgyz remained under…


Cholpon Ata

Once upon a time, a long time – so long ago that the people have forgotten exactly when it was – under a high mountain there was a city. Above the city towered the fortress of powerful khan. The khan was famous for his riches, but more than that – for his cruelty. Each day,…


Kyrgyzstan – Russia

In 1876 Russian troops defeated the Quqon Khanate and occupied northern Kyrgyzstan. Within five years, all Kyrgyzstan had become part of the Russian Empire, and the Kyrgyz slowly began to integrate themselves into the economic and political life of Russia. In the last decades of the nineteenth century, increasing numbers of Russian and Ukrainian settlers…


The Three Orphans

A id and a lamb became orphans. One day they went for a walk and met a calf. He was an orphan, too. The three of them decided never to part. One day, they came across a tiger skin lying in the road. They picked it up and put it on the calf and went…


 
 
All rights reserved. 2007
 
WISCO